04
Thursday
July
6:00 pm
Jazzmobile Presents: Nat Adderley Jr.
FIREWORKS AND JAZZ TO CELEBRATE THE 4th OF JULY

Minton's playhouse
206 West 118th Street

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Event Details:
JAZZMOBILE LAUNCHES ITS THURSDAY NIGHT RESIDENCY AT MINTON’S PLAYHOUSE – THE NEWEST ADDITION TO – NEW YORK CITY’S LONGEST RUNNING JAZZ FESTIVAL: “JAZZMOBILE’S SUMMERFEST!”
HAPPY HOUR 5:00-8:00 PM
NO COVER – A FREE ADMISSION EVENT!!
MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS FOR 7:30 PM &/OR *9:30 PM SHOW
THERE IS A $30 MINIMUM FOR FOOD AND OR BEVERAGES
BE SURE TO BE THERE BY 9:00 PM TO VIEW THE MACY*S 4th OF JULY SCREEN TV. *THE SECOND SHOW STARTS, RIGHT AFTER THE FIREWORKS!

Harlem,  New  York,  June  18,  2019  –  Jazzmobile  Inc.  and  Minton’s Playhouse  have  entered  into  a  new partnership to present live music at the  iconic  Minton’s Playhouse  jazz club, 206 West 118th Street,  in Harlem.

This open-ended residency will begin on Independence Day with pianist  Nat Adderley, Jr. and will  continue every Thursday evening with a world-class jazz band. The Summer lineup will be announced at the opening celebration on July 4.

The Jazzmobile Residency concerts will be presented on following Thursdays with set times at 7:30 pm and 9:30 pm. The classic Minton’s Playhouse restaurant will be available for appetizers and dinner each week.

One of the  most important shrines in the history of jazz,  Minton’s Playhouse in Harlem was the place where Bebop  was  born  and  where  the  foundations  of  modern  jazz  were  established.  Founded  in  1938  by  the saxophonist Henry Minton, the club became the setting for a revolution in jazz. Among the legends who graced the  stage  were  Thelonious  Monk,  Dizzy  Gillespie,  Charlie  Parker,  Charlie  Christian,  Duke  Ellington,  Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, Benny Goodman, Coleman Hawkins, Lester Young, Johnny Hodges, Ben Webster, Sarah Vaughan, Carmen McRae, Billy Eckstine, Erroll Garner  and more. After a fire, the club closed in 1974, but  more than 30 years  later, it reopened in 2006.  Today, Minton’s remains the home of some of the world’s finest jazz.

Jazzmobile, is the oldest not-for-profit arts organization created just for jazz in the country. In 2019  Jazzmobile is presenting SUMMERFEST, New York City’s longest running Jazz Festival, all summer long. Founded in 1964 by National Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master Dr. Billy Taylor and philanthropist Ms. Daphne Arnstein with NEA Jazz  Master  Jimmy Heath,  Jazzmobile  has a mission to present, preserve, promote, and propagate America’s classical jazz through quality music education and performance programs. To learn more, visit jazzmobile.org.

Biography:

Nat Adderley Jr. was born in Quincy, Florida on May 23, 1955. The scion of a famed jazz family, he grew up in Teaneck, New Jersey, moving to that suburban New York City community with his family when he was five years old. He started playing piano as a child and had his first song, “I’m on My Way”, recorded by his uncle Cannonball on the 1967 album Why Am I Treated So Bad! by the Cannonball Adderley Quintet when the young Nat Adderley was only 11 years old. While at the Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts in New York City, Adderley first met Luther Vandross, who attended Taft High School in the Bronx. It is with Vandross, who Adderley would later spend much of his musical career. He attended Yale University, graduating with a degree in African American studies

While living in Houston, Texas, he was the music arranger for the 1981 album Never Too Much which became Vandross’s first hit with the title track, which reached number 33 on the Billboard Hot 100 and fourth on the dance charts. He continued working with Vandross, whom he called “a hilarious guy, a great employer, a great friend, and an incredible musician”, until the singer’s stroke in February 2003 that effectively ended his career.

Adderley has returned to his jazz roots, performing his own works, as well as tributes to both his father and uncle. He cites his influences as Chick Corea, John Coltrane and Thelonious Monk. In a 2009 interview with the Star-Ledger he said pianists “who are killing me” include Kenny Barron, Herbie Hancock, Cedar Walton and Joe Zawinul.